Retirement, Retirement Journey, Social Security

The 4 Years before Retirement

lose up photo of green flower
Photo by Vraj Shah

Spoiler Alert. We now have a date.  My husband is officially retiring in 4 years and we are busy gearing up for the day when he will no longer be getting a paycheck.  My husband’s retirement age will be 60!

I guess that doesn’t qualify us for the F.I.R.E. (Financial Independence, Retire Early) movement, but it sure beats waiting until 70 or beyond to retire.

I have been reading a lot of articles on pre-retirement planning.  While I may not have anything extra to add, I thought it would be advantageous to share how we will be preparing for our retirement.  I will document our personal journey in this space as a way to keep me accountable.

For us, we have concluded that there are five things we need to consider before we retire.  In general terms, they are:

  1. Our Health – what will our anticipated well-being be when we retire – and what we will do in the next five years to make that the best it can be;
  2. Our Wealth – what we will have potentially saved in our retirement accounts, how we will navigate withdrawals and when we will be the most advantageous time to take our social security benefit;
  3. Our Expenses – what our retirement expenses will look like including medical expenses;
  4. Our home – where we will live out our retirement years and if we will move, downsize or stay put; and
  5. Our Hobbies & Interests – what we will do with all that free time.

In future posts, I will be sharing how we will be preparing and addressing each of the above five considerations.   I hope you’ll join me.

If you are thinking about retiring, how are you preparing?  If you are already retired, am I missing something?

 

Retirement, Retirement Journey, Social Security

62 or 67? The $188,000.00 Question.

Social Security Age-1.png

$188,000.00 is the amount of money that we would leave on the proverbial table if we waited until our retirement age of 67 to take Social Security.  By quickly calculating the difference in the amount we would receive, it would take 12 years for us to break even.

Waiting until 67 allows the benefit to ‘grow’ 8% each year, which financial advisors will tell you is a great rate.  (But you all know how I feel about financial advisors However, the 8%  incentive is only good if you live well beyond 74.  The operative word being ‘live’.  All of the social security benefit goes away when you die.  Since we don’t know when we are going to die, it remains the one thing that makes this decision a gamble either way.

I will have to make a similar decision on a pension that I expect to receive in five years.  Based on the numbers at this time, I can either take $600 a month for life, or a lump sum of $137,000.  If I live another 30 years, the monthly payment would be $216,000.00 in total pay outs but would end upon my death, whenever that may be.   However, if I take the lump sum, invest it conservatively (earning 4-5%) while taking $600 a month, after 30 years I would still have $64,000.00.  It can continue to grow and be given to my heirs even after I’m gone.

Screenshot_2019-06-14 How long will my money last with systematic withdrawals Calculators by CalcXML

 

This seems very similar to the decision with Social Security.

If we never spent the monthly checks from social security from 62-67, the $188,000 could be invested (conservatively at 4-5%) until 67.  At 67, we would have

$216,000.00

Now let’s say I started taking the extra $1,200 a month I would have gotten if I waited until 67, from that investment still earning 4-5% a year.  I would be able to pull that money out for another 25 years.  If I die before the 25 years is up, that money can go to my heirs as well.

Screenshot_2019-06-14 How long will my money last with systematic withdrawals Calculators by CalcXML(1)

I’ve accounted for taxes and low investment yields.  It seems like a no brainer to me.  I should take the money the earliest it is offered.

Okay all you math nerds…am I missing something?